Sober Celebrities: A Trip To The Hollywood Walk Of Fame

Sober Celebrities: A Trip To The Hollywood Walk Of Fame

This week I’m writing to you from sunny California!

A few days ago I was in LA doing lots of touristy things in Hollywood, where they’re getting ready for the Oscars. Walking around such an iconic place got me thinking about sober celebrities.

In this crazy, boozy world of ours, it’s easy to assume that everyone drinks – especially in showbiz, with all that glitz and glamour. 

But the truth is that some of the most successful people on the planet have got to where they are because they don’t waste their time, money, health and energy on alcohol!


As I mentioned in the video, not every sober celebrity has a star on the Hollywood walk of fame.

There are tons more sober celebs who don’t get a mention in the video, so I wanted to give them a namecheck here:

Kristin Davis (Sex And The City) Bradley Cooper (star of The Hangover films!) Jada Pinkett-Smith (actress) Simon Pegg (actor) Sarah Millican (comedian) Jim Carrey (actor) Fatboy Slim (DJ) Gerard Butler (actor)

Christina Ricci (actress) Ewan McGregor (actor) Stephen King (author) Russell Brand (comedian) Robert Downey Jr (actor) Kendrick Lamar (rapper) Jonny Wilkinson (former rugby union player) Frankie Boyle (comedian)

Freddie Flintoff (former cricketer) Calvin Harris (DJ) Rachel Stevens (singer) Brad Pitt (a new edition to the sober club) Anna Wintour (Vogue editor) Blake Lively (actress) Christina Ricci (actress) Davina McCall (TV presenter)

Eva Mendez (actress) Leona Lewis (singer) Natalie Portman (actress) Zoe Ball (TV presenter) Chris Martin (from Coldplay)

 

Who’s your favourite sober celebrity?

Let me know if I’ve missed anyone off the list!

 

25 Ineffective Ways Of Controlling Your Alcohol Intake

25 Ineffective Ways Of Controlling Your Alcohol Intake

For a long time, I was very keen on the idea of moderation.

I was drinking too much and feeling awful… but I didn’t want to stop completely. Sobriety was way too radical a step for someone like me, right?

I was one of those people who bought nice wine. I didn’t drink every day of the week. I held down a good job. I went running and drank smoothies and practised yoga. I was definitely not some rock bottom, down-and-out drinker.

But… when I did drink, things went a bit crazy. Once I started, I couldn’t stop. I definitely seemed to be missing an off switch!

I was convinced I just needed to find some better strategies for cutting down.

So with the help of google, I devised some creative schemes to help me manage and control my alcohol intake.

I’d really hate for all that ‘research’ to go to waste, so please do let me share it with you…

 

(Consider this the opposite of a list of suggestions!)

  1. Buy low alcohol drinks
  2. Keep alcohol out of the house
  3. Don’t drink alone
  4. Wait until 6pm to start drinking
  5. Buy alcohol you don’t actually like the taste of
  6. Only drink with meals
  7. Only drink wine
  8. Only drink beer
  9. Only drink during happy hour
  10. Only drink at the weekend
  11. Only drink on alternate days
  12. Buy miniature bottles of wine
  13. Use smaller glasses
  14. If buying regular bottles, tip away some of it first
  15. Draw a line at the halfway mark on the bottle
  16. Add water or ice to your drinks
  17. Drink a glass of water after every alcoholic drink
  18. Take less cash out with you
  19. In pubs, buy all your own drinks and avoid rounds
  20. Drink only low calorie drinks – use weight loss as a motivator
  21. Book an early morning gym class as a deterrent
  22. Pace yourself: commit to only having one drink an hour
  23. Or set a timer and have one sip every 5 minutes
  24. Keep an alcohol units diary where you set goals and targets
  25. Take a week off every now and then to try and ‘reset’.

 

Here’s what I learnt…

When it comes to dealing with a mind-altering, addictive drug that zaps your willpower and changes the way you think, it’s really hard to stick to your plans, no matter what tricks you use.

The methods above would work every now and then, but never on a consistent basis. Plus, sticking to these self-imposed rules was really hard work. I’m nearly five years sober now and just looking back at this list makes me feel exhausted!

It’s the decision-making fatigue that gets you. You’re constantly having to exercise willpower, negotiate with yourself about when you’ll drink, what you’ll have, whether you’ll stick to the rules, break them, push the boundaries, etc etc… it’s a constant drain on your energy.

 

I wish I’d known back then…

That not drinking at all was actually so much easier. Honestly – it’s such a breeze by comparison! The problem with cutting down (rather than cutting out) is that it reinforces the belief that you cannot properly enjoy life without alcohol.

You carry on feeding that part of you that’s been duped into thinking you can’t be truly content unless you have a little bit of this liquid drug in your life. Putting a toxic, cancer-causing poison up on a pedestal like that is really not a good idea.

When you’re sober, you get to see booze for what it really is i.e. a load of crap that’s holding you back.

 

Tolerance will bite you on the bum

Here’s the real kicker. Even if you’re determined to play the moderation game – and you’re happy to put lots of willpower, effort and energy into controlling booze – tolerance WILL screw you over in the end.

No matter what your alcohol intake, there will eventually come a point where you need more booze in order to feel the same effects.

 

Ok, so what do I do now?

Pause and reflect
Be honest with yourself: how long have you been trying to cut down for? How have those attempts to control your drinking made you feel? As I discovered, there’s no real secret to moderation: it’s highly unlikely that there’s a magic trick out there you’ve missed.

Ask the right question
Too often we focus on whether our drinking is ‘bad enough’ for us to quit, when really, we should be asking, “Is this good enough for me to stay as I am?” In other words, are you willing to keep on putting up with all the downsides to drinking, because they’re not going to go away. I wrote about this here.

Take a break from booze
If you’re ready to try something new, take sobriety for a test drive. Give it 100% for a set period of time e.g. six weeks. Then you can see how you feel at the end – you might just be surprised how much you love it! For more help with this, check out my stop drinking course. I also talk more about taking a break here.

 

How To Relax And Manage Stress Without Alcohol

How To Relax And Manage Stress Without Alcohol

I used to have a fridge magnet that said: “Keep Calm And Drink Wine!”
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The message was spelt out in large capital letters and for a long time, it seemed to be my mantra.

If I wanted to relax, I drank wine. If I wanted to switch off, I drank wine. If I had a stressful day, then guess what? I drank wine, and lots of it.

When I started thinking about quitting drinking, the idea of coming home and not opening a bottle seemed unimaginable. 

If you can relate, check out my tips below. When it comes to alcohol, stress and sobriety, there’s some stuff you really, really need to know…

 

Make sure you’re clear on what alcohol does and does NOT do

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The first step to learning how to relax without alcohol is to understand what’s actually going on.

Alcohol does not have magic powers

The idea that alcohol can ease or relieve your stress is a myth – it’s all smoke and mirrors (and a bit of wishful thinking). You do not deserve to fall for this lie!

True relaxation is achieved by removing the source of discontent. Alcohol, by definition, just cannot do that. It can’t remove annoyances and stressors.

All booze can do is numb your brain and your senses. That doesn’t relieve you of your stress – it just zombifies you, and numbs you from your one and only life.

If anything, alcohol is a stress delayer

If you drink enough, you will pass out and therefore be unable to feel anything. That much is true. But when you wake up at 3am – thirsty, hungover, guilty and exhausted – that stress will still be there, tapping you on the shoulder. (And in the middle of the night, everything feels ten times worse.)

Look at your stress levels right now

If alcohol really was capable of gobbling up stress and making it disappear, then surely all drinkers would be super-chilled, laid back people? And if alcohol genuinely destroyed stress left, right and centre, surely your need for it would reduce, rather than increase over time?

 

“Alcohol causes low blood sugar, drains the body of water, overworks the liver, pancreas and kidneys and leaches oxygen from the brain. That doesn’t sound very relaxing to me.”
Jason Vale

 

Acknowledge the truth: alcohol doesn’t relieve stress, it creates it!

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When you’re drinking, you’re literally pouring stress into your life, glass by glass.

Stop adding fuel to the fire

How many times have you said something you’ve regretted whilst drinking? Or perhaps you’ve missed a deadline, or forgotten something important as a result of being hungover. That kind of stuff sets you up for another stressful day and then another, and another…

In sobriety, you have less to stress about in the first place

How much time do you spend worrying about your alcohol intake, beating yourself up and battling with yourself about your drinking? That is all stressful in its own right! Cutting out alcohol means you cut out stress.

Sobriety makes you more resilient

Here’s the real kicker: alcohol reduces our ability to deal with stress and anxiety. (This article explains more.) The good news is that sobriety can help reverse this.

Cheryl, a student from my Getting Unstuck course, was taking two different antidepressants and a prescribed sleeping pill when she joined my class last year. She’s now 12 months sober and off all her medication. What a result!

 

Experiment with new ways of relaxing and unwinding

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It’s time to find some new coping mechanisms. This is the fun bit, so get experimenting!

Find out what works for you

I think exercise is great because it releases endorphins that give you a natural high. I also like journaling because getting thoughts out of my head and onto paper helps me make sense of them (and take action).

I’d also recommend listening to music, practising meditation, calling a friend or doing anything that brings you joy, be it having a bath or listening to an audiobook whilst walking in the fresh air.

Don’t forget to take care of the basics: so often what you really need at wine o’clock is food and water. Hunger and dehydration are massive triggers that can be easily taken care of.  

You have got time for this!

If you can find time to drink – and recover from it, worry about it and beat yourself up over it – then you can find time to do stuff that genuinely relaxes you.

Look at your current routine for clues

Think about what you already enjoy doing and look at what’s really going on there. For example, one of your favourite ways to ‘unwind’ might be talking to your partner over a bottle of wine.

Most drinkers have been trained to think that alcohol is the special ingredient that’s making that scenario relaxing, but as I explained above, that isn’t really the case.

However, there ARE some things about that scenario that are genuinely relaxing: you’re coming home and removing yourself from a stressful environment. Maybe you change out of your work clothes. You’re also spending quality time with your partner, talking through your day and getting stuff off your chest.

My point is, you can still go home and do all of that over a cup of tea – and it will be just as therapeutic, if not better.

 

6 Common Beliefs About Booze That Just Aren’t True

6 Common Beliefs About Booze That Just Aren’t True

I hope you’re having a good sober October!
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I’m thrilled to be back after taking a few weeks off to launch another live session of my Getting Unstuck course. (Missed it? You can catch the next class in January)

The Sober School has grown a lot over the past year, as has the entire alcohol-free, online sober movement. The idea of taking some time off from drinking is becoming more and more normal, which is great news for all of us! Anything that makes our alcohol-obsessed world a little less boozy has got to be a good thing.

If you’re working on a sober October right now, today’s blog post will really help you to stay motivated.

I wanted to set the record straight on a few common beliefs about booze that I hear ALL the time. The last thing you need are myths and misguided philosophies​ getting in the way of your alcohol-free lifestyle!

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Here are 6 common myths about alcohol:

 

 “A bit of booze is good for you.”

The Committee on Carcinogenicity (an independent body that advises the government whether substances are likely to cause cancer) says drinking ANY level of alcohol increases the risk of a range of cancers. You can read their report here.

As for that old idea that red wine is good for the heart? It’s an outdated myth. England’s Chief Medical officer calls it an ‘old wives tale’ for good reason. This 2014 study found that drinking alcohol provides no heart benefit at all, and recent government guidance stated “there is no justification for drinking for health reasons.”

 

 “Alcohol helps me deal with stress.”

A glass of wine won’t stop the kids fighting or make your boss nicer or fix your relationship. Alcohol does not have the power to solve the things that make you stressed. What alcohol can do is increase anxiety whilst hangovers lower your resilience to stress. So it’s a double whammy – you lose out twice.

It’s socially acceptable to say that you drink because you’re stressed, but what most people are really doing is drinking to numb out. And if you’ve ever been hysterically happy or extremely sad whilst drunk, you’ve got to wonder – does alcohol really do that good a job of numbing your emotions? (Surely, if it was an effective numbing agent, you wouldn’t be able to feel any emotion?)

 

 “Booze before bed makes you sleep better.”

Drinking might help you crash out by making you drowsy, but it also stops you from having the deep, restorative sleep you need in order to feel truly rested. That’s why you often wake up at 4am, exhausted but somehow unable to sleep.

Some people struggle with their sleep when they first stop drinking and it sucks, I know. But please be patient – the solution isn’t to go back to drinking! Alcohol really screws up your sleep cycle and your body is just taking a bit longer to adjust. Hang on in there – in the long term, an alcohol-free lifestyle is one of the best things you can do to improve the quality of your sleep. 

 

 “Alcohol makes you happier.”

Maybe you think you’re the life and soul of the party after your third gin and tonic. Perhaps you’re convinced that the drunk you is a happier, more upbeat version of your regular self. The idea that we transform into different people when we’re under the influence is a popular one. Turns out, though, ‘drunk you’ might not be as much of a thing as you think.

A new study from the University of Missouri has found that other people can’t see that much of a difference in our personalities when we’re drunk, compared to when we’re sober. This is a good reminder that so much of alcohol’s power lies in what we believe it does. And so often, what we believe to be true becomes true.

 

 “My drinking doesn’t affect anyone else.”

New research shows that children are far more aware of their parents alcohol consumption than we might like to think. The Institute of Alcohol Studies says even moderate parental drinking can upset children and cause them anxiety.

This report backs up a lot of the anecdotal feedback I’ve had from the mums on my stop drinking course. Even very young children, who don’t really ‘get’ what wine is, seem quick to pick up on the change in your energy levels (and your willingness to read a bedtime story).

 

 “If you’re careful, you can outsmart a hangover.”

As we head towards the end of the year – and into party season – be prepared to see a lot of articles about hangover cures. You know the ones I mean – they promise that you’ll be able to party till dawn AND look flawless in the office. All you need to do is guzzle green juice, use expensive foundation and meditate in a special way…

It’s total nonsense of course. These articles are selling a lifestyle that doesn’t really exist; you cannot consume glass after glass of toxic poison and not feel it the next day! NHS advice says, “The best way to avoid a hangover is not to drink.”

 

15 Reasons Why You’ll Love Life Alcohol-Free

15 Reasons Why You’ll Love Life Alcohol-Free

Have you been thinking about taking a break from booze?

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Perhaps you planned on quitting this month – yet you can’t seem to get motivated enough to actually do it?

I know what that feels like.

One of the things that helped me to quit was reminding myself of everything I was missing out on by continuing to drink.

Yes, you read that right. People always think that sobriety is about missing out and feeling deprived, when in fact, it’s the other way round.

By staying stuck in the same miserable cycle of hangovers and guilt, you’re missing out on a very happy, healthy, feel-good lifestyle.

So… if you’re sober curious, get ready to make the leap! Here’s what you’ll get in return:

 

1. You’ll look better naked

A bottle of wine contains around 600 calories… that’s the equivalent of three doughnuts! Add in a bit of junk food (helpful for battling a hangover) and it really adds up. Your waistline will thank you for cutting out all those empty calories. 

 

2. You’ll be happier

Alcohol gives you a very brief, artificial high, followed by a long and painful low. You know how awful it is when you feel hungover, depressed and anxious; you spend all day beating yourself up. When you stop drinking, it feels as if a huge weight has been lifted.

 

3. It’s easier than trying to cut down

Yes, really – trying to control a mind-altering substance is super hard. (I wrote more about moderation here.)

 

4. Bye-bye puffy face

The vanity argument for stopping drinking motivates a lot of people and it should do. I get my students to take a picture at the beginning of their 6 week course and another at the end. The results are always impressive.

 

5. Your confidence will skyrocket

When you go without alcohol for an extended period of time – whether it’s six weeks, or two months, or whatever – you’ll likely end up in some social situations where you’d normally drink. This is not a bad thing, it’s a good thing! Being able to socialise without alcohol is an excellent skill to have.

 

6. You’ll become a badass

Taking a break from alcohol will force you to shake things up and act a little differently from the masses. This can be scary at first. But once you’ve done one brave thing, who knows what you’ll do next? If you found the courage to stop drinking, you might find the courage to ask for what you want in other areas of life too.

 

7. Your weekends will get longer

When I was boozing, weekends passed by in a blur of drinking and feeling hungover. Before I knew it, Monday morning had rolled round and I was moaning about not having enough time off. When you’re alcohol-free, you have 24 quality hours in a day.

 

8. You’ll actually DO stuff

You know that yoga class you keep saying you’ll go to? That family trip you promised to organise? Or that book idea you’ve told everyone about, at least a hundred times? When you take action and cut out alcohol (a willpower-sapping, confidence-destroying, time-sucking drug) you set off a whole chain of events. You become a doer.

 

9. You’ll sleep better

Alcohol really screws up your sleep cycle. It might help you pass out at night, but it also stops you from getting the deep, restorative sleep you need in order to feel truly rested. (Don’t worry if your sleep takes a little while to settle down in early sobriety – it will work itself out, especially if you take a proper break from booze.)

 

10. You’ll have lots more energy

If you’re fed up of feeling drained and exhausted all the time, taking some time off from drinking will make you feel so much better. It will give you a huge energy boost.

 

11. TV shows won’t be so confusing

I find the storylines sooo much easier to follow when I can actually remember what happened in the last episode… 

 

12. Your bank manager will love you

Alcohol ain’t cheap – when you’re drinking, you’re throwing money down the drain all the time. When I polled some of the women I’ve coached, they saved on average £365 in six weeks – that’s about $480 dollars. (Tip: before you stop drinking, start measuring. How much are you really spending on booze each week? Look at those receipts – you might be surprised.)

 

13. You can get ready for bed properly

How many times have you fallen asleep on the sofa, fully dressed – or gone to bed with makeup still on and your teeth unbrushed? Being sober enough to put your PJs on might not sound like a big deal, but it sure feels good in the morning.

 

14. You’ll have a better sex life

Alcohol numbs your feelings – and in the bedroom, this is not good…

 

15. You’ll feel fantastically proud of yourself 🙂

It’s horrible when you know you should be doing something about your drinking, but you aren’t. The feeling you get when you take action – and follow through on your goals – is amazing. 

 

How To Stay Alcohol-Free Next Weekend

How To Stay Alcohol-Free Next Weekend

These days, my Monday mornings feel pretty good.

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But not so long ago, they used to be about coping. 
Coping with a hangover. Coping with the guilt of another wasted weekend. Coping with work, when I didn’t feel at all rested or ok. Coping with the pressure of promising myself that this week would be different, that this week I would be good.

If you can relate, you’re not alone. Today I’m answering a question from Lisa, who writes:

“Most weeks I manage not to drink from Monday to Thursday, and I feel pretty good about that. But I can’t get through the weekend without drinking. I start on Friday night and then it’s all downhill from there. By Sunday I’m always so annoyed at myself for wasting the weekend.”

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So how do you weekend-proof your sobriety? Here are my tips.

 

Keep your eye on the prize

Take a moment to visualise, in detail, what you’d like next weekend to be like. How would you love to feel and what would you love to be doing?

My alcohol-free weekends are approximately 100 times more interesting than my old, boozy ones. I love waking up on a Saturday morning and going for a run, rather than moping around the house, feeling anxious about how much I drank the night before. I like knowing that I will have time to do the things that need to get done (rather than leaving it up to fate to see what I’ll be able to manage with a hangover).

I enjoy the feeling of real-life relaxation. It is sooo much better than falling for the illusion of the alcohol-induced version (that fake high that lifts you up and then brings you crashing down at 3am). Best of all, I love that I am no longer wishing my life away, by obsessing over drinking or not drinking all the time.

Life gives us so many opportunities, but it’s hard to spot them when you’ve got your wine goggles on. If you work hard from Monday to Friday, then you deserve two proper days off at the weekend. You deserve to feel good and to enjoy your time off. Don’t let alcohol rob you of that. Decide now: what will this coming weekend look like for you?

 

Plan an alternative Friday night

How are you feeling by 5pm on a Friday? Most of us are pretty knackered and worn out! You will find sobriety hard if you just try and white knuckle through the evening, ignoring how you’re feeling. A much better plan of action is to decide – in advance – what you’re going to do to take care of yourself.

Cravings are nearly always a clue that you need something. More often than not, they’re a sign that you’re tired, hungry, thirsty or stressed out. So make a plan for that. You know alcohol doesn’t genuinely relax you – just think about how stressed you are after a few days of drinking. There are plenty of other lovely, relaxing things you can do instead.

Maybe you go to a Friday night yoga class. Maybe you go swimming or sit in the jacuzzi. Maybe you watch a movie and order a takeaway. Maybe you have a bath, watch some TV, curl up with a book or go to bed early. Maybe you invite a friend round for dinner (you could always prep the food in advance, so it’s all done). Maybe you tick a few chores off your to do list, keep yourself busy and get on top of things. Think about what might work for you next Friday night, and start planning it now.

 

Get clear on what a good ‘treat’ is

You often hear people say things like, “I’ll have this glass of wine – it’s a Friday night treat.” Or, “Go on – treat yourself! It’s the weekend after all.” You get the gist. Somewhere along the way we picked up this idea that wine isn’t good for us (correct) but instead of deciding not to invite it into our lives, we decided to make it a ‘treat’ instead. We’ve glorified and romanticised alcohol to a point where we’ve almost forgotten that we’re talking about a cancer causing drug. We forget that ethanol is the same thing we fuel our cars with, or strip paint with.

This weekend, make a list of things that could genuinely feel like a treat for you. Maybe it’s curling up with a book, catching up with friends, a spa treatment or going out for brunch. Think about how you can treat yourself with high quality experiences, not drugs.

For the women I coach inside my Getting Unstuck course, the biggest triumph is not “I’ve managed to resist wine all weekend!” but rather, “There’s wine at home and I didn’t even WANT a glass.” They feel like that because they got clear on what is a treat and what’s not.

 


Remember, there’s nothing magical about Mondays!

If you do slip up, start over immediately. Don’t write the weekend off as a failure or give yourself a free pass to drink through the rest of it.

I understand the idea that a new week = a new start. Monday is nearly always the day when we begin new diets and fitness regimes etc! But I also know that there’s nothing magical about Mondays. In fact, for many of us, Monday is one of the busiest, toughest days of the week! It’s just as easy to start over on a Saturday or a Sunday (or a Wednesday or whenever).

If your drinking is making you miserable, then the best time to stop is always right now. Right this second.

 

And now a question for you…

One of the best things about alcohol-free weekends is all the time you get back. Suddenly, you can find yourself doing stuff you would never have done before (hello, Sunday morning yoga class…). What do you do with all your spare time during your sober weekends? What do you love most about them? Let me know, because your experiences are bound to inspire others.

Kate
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